Why the US Postal Service should market their facilities as advertising media

The Postal Service has one of the largest fleets of vehicles in the world, numerous buildings, and thousands of mailboxes around the country. That is a huge saturation of potential billboards. If they would market their trucks, buildings, and mailboxes as promotion media, they could get out of debt, turn a profit, and lower the price of postage to better compete with email.


Just as there are ads on the sides of buses, there can be ads on the trucks, either complete wraps or framed placards. The need for branding the truck as USPS is minor - the value of generating income is far greater. If necessary, there could also still be a smaller USPS brand on the truck, though the size and shape of most of the trucks may be enough of a unique brand. There could be individual ads or a company could sponsor all the trucks in a zip code area. The ads can be easily tailored for specific markets, based on zip code demographic data. Campaigns could also be for movies, television shows, or special events and concerts.

Such campaigns could include the street corner boxes or those could be purchased separately. Example: the entire box could be painted red with the Coke logo and bottle shape on the sides.
Below is an example of a vinyl wrapped box. With a Princess posting a letter.

Sidebar: That reminds of the time I was playing Bingo in the basement of the old First Baptist Church and I only needed B 1 to win the evening's big jackpot - a dinner for two with unlimited cheese rolls at Cracker Barrel. So, I yelled out to the ball caller at the front of the room, under the picture of Jesus with the lambs, "Oh, B1, you're my only hope."

A few USPS figures
160 billion - number of pieces of mail processed
40 - percent of the world's mail volume handled by the US Postal Service
31,272 - number of Postal Service-managed retail offices
212,530 - number of vehicles - one of the largest civilian fleets in the world
1.3 billion - number of miles driven each year by letter carriers and truck drivers
0 - tax dollars received for operating the Postal Service

The huge obstacle
The US Postal Service is overseen by the US Congress, yep, that do-nothing group of immature bickering egos. The above idea may be too logical and productive for the Congress to understand and implement. Oh well, it was a good idea.

The United States Postal Service is one of the few government agencies explicitly authorized by the United States Constitution. The USPS traces its roots to 1775 during the Second Continental Congress, where Benjamin Franklin was appointed the first postmaster general. The cabinet-level Post Office Department was created in 1792 from Franklin's operation and transformed into its current form in 1971 under the Postal Reorganization Act. The USPS employs over 574,000 workers and operates over 260,000 vehicles. The USPS is the operator of the largest vehicle fleet in the world. The USPS is legally obligated to serve all Americans, regardless of geography, at uniform price and quality. The USPS has not directly received taxpayer-dollars since the early 1980s with the minor exception of subsidies for costs associated with the disabled and overseas voters.
Sidenote: If the Post Office is ever to make a profit, it absolutely must be removed from under the control of the US Congress.


Let me see if I have this right
• I can write a 3-page letter, and put it on my front door.
• That same day, someone authorized by the government will stop at my house and pick up that letter.
• The letter will then be transported anywhere in the country.
• It will then be hand-delivered to the front door of the person I wrote the letter to.
• This cross-country trip will take 2-3 days.
• It will cost me about 50 cents - 2 quarters.
And some people bitch because that is so expensive. 50 pennies!

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